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Japanese Beetles On Trees

Japanese Beetles

Japanese

Japanese Beetles larva was introduced to New Jersey from Japan. Thus the name, the Japanese Beetle! They arrived in the root-stocks of plants. Adults have a tendency to invade parks, gardens along with other area that is large.

Additionally,  Japanese beetles are well established in eastern and central areas of Kansas, and are slowly moving westward.  The  adults are among the most detrimental insect pests of horticultural plants in both gardens and landscapes.  Japanese Beetles are easy to identify, compliment of their amazing colors.  They feature metallic blue-green heads, copper backs, and tan wings.  These are unique color patterns you won’t find in any other beetle.

 

 

Japanese Beetles favorite meal is ornamental plants, vegetables, shrubs, and trees. Larvae feed on plants’ roots of vegetation and golf course find lawns. Very destructive beetle.

The larvae or grub is a leading turf grass insect pest in golf lawns, commercial settings, and residential .  In spring, usually April and May, they return more closely to the surface, where they feed on grass roots for a few weeks, pupate and come out as adult beetles from mid-June to mid-July.  Japanese beetles lay their eggs in the soil, frequently in June.  The eggs then develop into white grubs that have brown heads, 6 legs, and reaching sizes of up to ¾ inch in long.  The eggs hatch within two weeks and the resulting larvae feed on the roots of your lawn, destroying your grass.  You can actually roll up the brown patches in your lawn and create sod for feed to your cattle.

The grubs eat until September to mid-October. Injury to plant roots is most common at this time. By the end of October, grubs are mostly full grown and ready to return to deeper soil for winter after your lawn is completely destroyed.

Japanese beetle adults feed through the upper leaf surface (epidermis) and leaf center (mesophyll), leaving the lower epidermis intact.  Adults usually avoid feeding on tissue between leaf veins, resulting in leaves appearing lace-like or skeletonized (Figure 3).  Japanese beetles like to move and feed in small groups, making them a bigger danger to your plants.Japanese Beetles favorite meal is ornamental plants, vegetables, shrubs, and trees. Larvae feed on roots of vegetation and golf course find lawns. Very catastrophic beetle.

The larvae or grub is a leading turf grass insect pest in golf lawns, commercial settings, and residential .  In spring, usually April and May, they return more closely to the surface, where they feed on grass roots for a few weeks, pupate and come out as adult beetles from mid-June to mid-July.  Japanese beetles lay their eggs in the soil, frequently in June.  The eggs then develop into white grubs that have brown heads, 6 legs, and reaching sizes of up to ¾ inch in long.  The eggs hatch within two weeks and the resulting larvae feed on the roots of your lawn, destroying your grass.  You can actually roll up the brown patches in your lawn and create sod for feed to your cattle.

The grubs eat until September to mid-October. Injury to plant roots is most common at this time. By the end of October, grubs are mostly full grown and ready to return to deeper soil for winter after your lawn is completely destroyed.

Japanese beetle adults feed through the upper leaf surface (epidermis) and leaf center (mesophyll), leaving the lower epidermis intact.  Adults usually avoid feeding on tissue between leaf veins, resulting in leaves appearing lace-like or skeletonized (Figure 3).  Japanese beetles like to move and feed in small groups, making them a bigger danger to your plants.

 

 

Predators of Japanese Beetles

  • Birds, such as cardinals, grackles, and starlings
  • Chickens, ducks, and geese
  • Spiders
  • Raccoons
  • Moles
  • Toads

How To Get Rid of The Japanese Beetle

  1. Milky Spore :  Japanese beetles are susceptible to a disease called milky spore, so researchers decided it’d just be easiest to give the diseases to the beetles—especially in their grub stage before they fully develop into flying adults.
  2. Chemical/Oil Mixtures:  Neem Oil: Neem oil is from trees and is non toxic excellent choice for natural pest control. Beetles ingest the oil and pass it along to the eggs. Thus, killing the larvae before adult stage
  3. Insecticides:    Read the label for pesticides that is labeled for Japanese Beetles. Most pesticides will attack the nervous system of the beetle. The best time to apply the spray is before the sun fully rises. Beetles are resting and you will get a good kill.
  4. Water-soap solutions:   One of the best solutions that is safe around you and your family. Soap suffocates beetles if applied correctly. Mix a quart of water with a teaspoon of dish soap. Then, put the solution into a spray bottle and apply it to any plants affected by the beetles
  5. Japanese beetle traps :   can be helpful in controlling large numbers of beetles, but they also might attract beetles from beyond your yard. Eugenol and geraniol, aromatic chemicals extracted from plants, are attractive to adult Japanese beetles as well as to other insects. The traps work by attracting the adults with pheromones and other scents they can’t resist. They fly into the trap, but can’t get back out. Unfortunately, the traps do not effectively suppress adults and might even result in a higher localized population. If you want to try them, be sure to place traps far away from target plants so that the beetles do not land on your favored flowers and crops on their way to the traps. Traps do catch a lot of beetles, but they also bring more into your yard. The best non-insecticidal control is to knock the beetles into a bucket of soapy water. You can also add covers to plants you want to protect.

 

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